tahiti/samoa/rarotonga (born 1966)

O le Saosao Lapo’a and Asiasi I reflects on the ironic and irreversible impact that over-fishing and exploitation of the Pacific’s natural resources has wrought on the traditional Pacific lifestyle. This includes changing virtually overnight the dietary habits of generations.

Is it co-incidental that significantly increasing health and dietary problems amongst Pacific Islanders has occurred during the same period that their premium fisheries catches are exported? And at the same time locals have experienced explosive growth of canned & other imported product’s flooding into the Pacific?

Michel Tuffery

 Asiasi 1 2000
 fish tins, recycled copper, aluminium,rivets, polyurethane
 collection of Auckland War Memorial Museum, 56068

The asiasi is the yellowfin tuna found between 40° north and 40° south of the equator, and mostly in the Pacific Ocean.

It is a large fish, sometimes weighing over 150 kilograms, that swims very rapidly over large distances. The asiasi is commercially fished, canned, and widely exported as food.
 O le Saosao Lapo’a 2000
 fish tins, recycled copper, aluminium,rivets, polyurethane
 collection of Auckland War Memorial Museum, 56067

The saosao or great barracuda is thin for its length, frequently reaching
one metre.

It is a voracious hunter, snapper and grouper are both amongst its prey. Although attacks on people are very rare, they are still feared by some swimmers as they can be very dangerous when provoked.